Sweet Potato is Your Fall Bae

Crunchy leaves. Later sunrises. Fall is here to stay, no doubt about it. I’m not going to lie and say I’m super pumped about the sudden chill–summer is my favorite season. It’s in my blood. I’m a desert rat what can I say?

If I had to pick one thing to be excited about for the cooler days ahead, though, it would surely be hanging out in the kitchen warmed by an oven cooking a delicious meal. And what might be inside that oven, you’re probably wondering, that could be so delicious?
Subtle yet dazzling. Muted but bold. What could it be?
Sweet potato, that’s what! This fall you’ll want to eat as much of it as you can get your hands on. Here’s why:
The nutritional value of this root vegetable is out the roof. Every vitamin you could imagine, sweet potato’s got you covered. A few of the benefits you’ll gain from eating one of these babies–potassium, Vitamin A, Vitamin B6, Vitamin C, and Fiber. That alone makes up for the summery fruit you’ll be missing in colder days.
They are incredibly versatile. I mean just think about the possibilities. Sweet potato chips, mashed sweet potato, sweet potato curry…the list goes on! Whatever you’re in the mood for, sweet potato will be there for you. This brings me to my last point…
How can you resist this face?

How can you resist this face?

They ooze warmth. Indeed, sweet potato is best served warm. They very act of preparing it to eat requires you to heat it in some way, whether over the stove, or in the oven. However you choose to prepare it, eat it right away. Sweet potato will warm your frozen heart in no time.
What are your favorite ways to prepare sweet potato this fall?
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Select the Best Fall Produce: Insider Tips from Sunnyside Farm

To continue our celebration of Fruits and Vegetables Month, I had a chance to catch up with Valerie Fowler of Sunnyside Farm in St Mary’s County, Maryland. Eastern Market is DC’s oldest, continuously operating farmer’s market and Valerie and her family have had a stall here since its opening, in 1873!

As we welcome Fall and the colorful fruits and vegetables the season brings with it, Valerie shares her advice with us on selecting the best squash from your local farmer’s market.

Here’s what Valerie says about shopping for fall vegetables:

Acorn Squash
Acorn Squash decorates the local farm stands in the fall. This vegetable has a hard, thin outer skin. It has the shape of an acorn with ribs. It is typically about 8 inches long and 5 inches in diameter. The orange/yellow interior flesh is firm and sweet with a nutty flavor. These squash come in many colors (dark green, white, orange, and colorful variegated varieties) To select acorn squash – pick one that feels heavy for its size, usually from 1 to 3 pounds. The skin should be smooth and free of any soft spots. There should be a partial orange color where the squash laid on the ground, which tells us that it was mature when picked.

The farmer typically picks the squash when the vines begin to dry up. However, The shopper does not see this part of the process. An overripe squash has the signs of being too orange in color (unless the squash is naturally an orange color), lighter in weight and the interior may start to have a dry, stringy inside. Due to the thick skin, the winter squash keeps longer than the thin skinned summer squash. Winter squash easily stores for 1 to 3 months at about 50 degrees. Since most households do not have this optimum temperature for storage, it is best to use the winter squash within a couple of weeks after purchase. Try to store in a cool dry area. You can cut up and store raw or cooked squash in a container in the refrigerator for a several days. Cooked acorn squash (chunks or mashed) can also be frozen for several months.”

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Butternut Squash
Butternut squash is a winter squash that is found on many farmer’s markets in the fall. The ripe exterior color is beige. The texture will be smooth and feel heavy for its size when you pick it up. There should be no green color on the outside if the butternut it is ripe. The skin should be a dull beige, firm to the touch with no soft spots. The interior flesh is a deep orange color.

It should be stored in a cool, dry area. Just like the acorn squash, a ripe butternut squash will last one to three months. Best to eat within a few weeks of purchase to guarentee you catch the flavor at its prime. It can be stored in fridge either raw or cooked –just like the acorn squash. Or, place cooked squash in freezer bags or air tight container in the freezer for up to several months.”

If you have a chance to visit Eastern Market in DC, be sure to visit Valerie and sample some of her fresh and delicious produce. For more information about Sunnyside Farm and Eastern Market in Washington, DC, visit this page here.

Thank you so much Valerie, for taking the time to share with us!

Tuesday 2Go: Product Review

Desperate for a quick on-the-go dinner, I ran to Safeway with hopes they had something healthy and cheap that would hold me over for my evening class. I first spotted the cooler by the prepared foods but had no luck there. Every single prepared salad bowl was made with either chicken, turkey, or fish. Disappointed but not yet defeated, I scurried over to the produce section thinking I could grab a few veggies and make my own salad when something caught my eye.

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Earthbound Farm Organics Powermeals! I noticed three different varieties—and each was suitable for veg*ns. I had heard about these but never found one in store until my run to Safeway. It was as if Earthbound had heard my pleas for help.

The three available options were: Asian Noodle, Southwest, and Spinach Quinoa. They each came with a $0.55 off coupon. As veg*ns we are hardly privy to choices and it took me a while to decide which one to try first. I ended up getting the Spinach Quinoa bowl to satisfy a spinach craving I had earlier.

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My immediate concern with these bowls was that each only contains around 200 calories. While perfect for a quick in-between meal or snack, I knew that I needed a few more calories to keep me going and so I grabbed a can of garbanzo beans to toss in with the bowl.

The contents of the salad were packaged well—each item was individually wrapped to presumably allow us to mix in toppings to our liking. I also read on the package that the dressing contained cheese and was high in sodium, so I decided to toss it aside. If you don’t eat dairy and are watching sodium, you probably know to read labels, but just wanted to make it a point.

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The quinoa was stuck together in clumps when it came out of the package, but after tossing it around with the spinach and the other toppings of sunflower seeds and dried blueberries, it broke up a little more. I mixed in a serving of garbanzo beans at the end for some extra protein (not pictured).

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I really enjoyed the flavors of this salad and am grateful Earthbound had the idea to create these bowls. They are perfect for on-the-go eating and you can’t beat the price for an organic, ready to eat salad. My only suggestion is that perhaps Earthbound could include a larger serving of protein for those of us who intend to eat these salads as a main meal. It’s easy to supplement though, with a can of your favorite beans. I’m looking forward to trying the other two bowls and sharing my thoughts with you.

I purchased this product on my own and did not receive any compensation from Earthbound for this review. All opinions are always my own.